a-window-to-the-east:

Mikhail Lomonosov’s Mosaic of the Battle of Poltava 

Mikhail Lomonosov (1711-65) was one of the leading figures of the Russian Enlightenment. Born in Archangel province, he became a polymath who excelled in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, philology and poetry. 

Lomonosov is considered one of the fathers of the modern Russian tongue, but perhaps his greatest achievement was co-founding Moscow University (named Lomonosov State University in his honour) along with his patron, Minister of Education Ivan Shuvalov. 

Lomonosov is also famed for his glass mosaics, with this scene from the Battle of Poltava being one of the most famous. The Battle of Poltava in 1709 is considered to be a turning point in the Great Northern War (1700-1721) that occupied most of Peter the Great’s reign. Charles XII of Sweden had invaded Russia, but as a result of Peter’s scorched earth policy, Charles was forced to turn south into Ukraine, where his tired troops were met by Peter’s army at Poltava. 

Although Poltava did not lead to a cessation of fighting, the decisive victory forced Charles into exile in the Ottoman Empire, from where he continued scheming against the Russians. Peter, making peace with the Ottomans after the disastrous River Pruth Campaign (1711), was able to go on the offensive and invade Finnish territories held by Sweden. When peace finally came in 1721 with the Treaty of Nystadt, Russia formally acquired a foothold in the Baltic, whence Peter projected Russia’s rising power from the new capital of St Petersburg (founded 1703).

a-window-to-the-east:

Mikhail Lomonosov’s Mosaic of the Battle of Poltava

Mikhail Lomonosov (1711-65) was one of the leading figures of the Russian Enlightenment. Born in Archangel province, he became a polymath who excelled in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, philology and poetry.

Lomonosov is considered one of the fathers of the modern Russian tongue, but perhaps his greatest achievement was co-founding Moscow University (named Lomonosov State University in his honour) along with his patron, Minister of Education Ivan Shuvalov.

Lomonosov is also famed for his glass mosaics, with this scene from the Battle of Poltava being one of the most famous. The Battle of Poltava in 1709 is considered to be a turning point in the Great Northern War (1700-1721) that occupied most of Peter the Great’s reign. Charles XII of Sweden had invaded Russia, but as a result of Peter’s scorched earth policy, Charles was forced to turn south into Ukraine, where his tired troops were met by Peter’s army at Poltava.

Although Poltava did not lead to a cessation of fighting, the decisive victory forced Charles into exile in the Ottoman Empire, from where he continued scheming against the Russians. Peter, making peace with the Ottomans after the disastrous River Pruth Campaign (1711), was able to go on the offensive and invade Finnish territories held by Sweden. When peace finally came in 1721 with the Treaty of Nystadt, Russia formally acquired a foothold in the Baltic, whence Peter projected Russia’s rising power from the new capital of St Petersburg (founded 1703).

"The bride conquered everyone. Dagmar regarded life with radiant eyes, and her simplicity and charm boded will for family life, although (Count Sergei) Sheremetyev wrote the truth: Not everyone in court accepted this hasty switch from the dead brother to the live one. They did not understand that her small and graceful body belonged not to NIks or Sasha but had been intended from birth for the heir of the throne. That is why her mother bore her….. From the day their engagement was announced, petite Dagmar was in charge of enormous Sasha. Once they were married, he never left her side. When she went to visit Denmark, he sat lost in her rooms, like a big hound that had lost its master.” (E. Radzinsky, Alexander II: The last Great Tsar)
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"The bride conquered everyone. Dagmar regarded life with radiant eyes, and her simplicity and charm boded will for family life, although (Count Sergei) Sheremetyev wrote the truth: Not everyone in court accepted this hasty switch from the dead brother to the live one. They did not understand that her small and graceful body belonged not to NIks or Sasha but had been intended from birth for the heir of the throne. That is why her mother bore her….. From the day their engagement was announced, petite Dagmar was in charge of enormous Sasha. Once they were married, he never left her side. When she went to visit Denmark, he sat lost in her rooms, like a big hound that had lost its master.” (E. Radzinsky, Alexander II: The last Great Tsar)
Zoom Info
"The bride conquered everyone. Dagmar regarded life with radiant eyes, and her simplicity and charm boded will for family life, although (Count Sergei) Sheremetyev wrote the truth: Not everyone in court accepted this hasty switch from the dead brother to the live one. They did not understand that her small and graceful body belonged not to NIks or Sasha but had been intended from birth for the heir of the throne. That is why her mother bore her….. From the day their engagement was announced, petite Dagmar was in charge of enormous Sasha. Once they were married, he never left her side. When she went to visit Denmark, he sat lost in her rooms, like a big hound that had lost its master.” (E. Radzinsky, Alexander II: The last Great Tsar)

teatimeatwinterpalace:


Empress Alexandra Feodorovna 

Lady Londonderry visited Russia in 1837 and was told of the Empress  ‘ that for the twenty years she has been in this country she has given so much happiness and she has never done harm to a soul.’

teatimeatwinterpalace:

Empress Alexandra Feodorovna

Lady Londonderry visited Russia in 1837 and was told of the Empress  ‘ that for the twenty years she has been in this country she has given so much happiness and she has never done harm to a soul.’

memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info
memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

“We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.
Zoom Info

memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Ливадийский дворец | Livadia Palace | Russia | Crimea | a few miles west of Yalta. 

We cannot find any words to express our joy and pleasure to have such a house, built exactly as we wanted. The architect Krasnov is an amazing fine fellow" - wrote Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna on September 20th, 1911, after his first visit to Livadia.

Livadia was originally built in 1911 as a summer palace for Nicholas II. The palace was designed by the Russian architect Nikolay Petrovich Krasnov in the Italian Renaissance style with some features of Byzantine, Arabian and Gothic architecture in addition. N.P. Krasnov managed to successfully inscribe the palace into the surrounding landscape and situate the building in such a way that all its sides were absolutely open for the sun. The palace contains 116 rooms, with interiors furnished in different styles. There are 5 grand rooms in the palace: Vestibule, the majestic Dining room (so-called “White Hall”), an English billiard-room, Rest room and a Tsar’s study of maple wood. This palace was the site of the historic Yalta Conference of 1945, when Joseph Stalin hosted the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and the U.S. president, Franklin Roosevelt, as these three world leaders decided the fate of eastern Europe after World War II. Today the palace is a museum.